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Tuesday, August 4, 2020 | History

2 edition of A plea for larger doses of antitoxin in the treatment of diphtheria found in the catalog.

A plea for larger doses of antitoxin in the treatment of diphtheria

by John Hildreth McCollom

  • 267 Want to read
  • 6 Currently reading

Published by Municipal Printing Office in Boston .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Diphtheria,
  • Diphtheria antitoxin,
  • Therapy,
  • Treatment,
  • Diphtheria Antitoxin

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby John McCollom
    The Physical Object
    Pagination19 p. ;
    Number of Pages19
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL24780689M
    OCLC/WorldCa82208669

    Three or four doses, given along with tetanus vaccine and pertussis vaccine, are recommended during childhood. Further doses of diphtheria-tetanus vaccine are recommended every ten years. Protection can be verified by measuring the antitoxin level in the : Corynebacterium diphtheriae (spread by . transferred antitoxin, and passive immunization in humans was used for treatment and prophylaxis during World War I. A method for inactivating tetanus toxin with formaldehyde was developed by Ramon in the early ’s which led to the development of tetanus toxoid by Descombey in It was first widely used during World War II.

    An antiserum to the toxin, known as an antitoxin, was developed, and this protected animals from fatal doses of diphtheria toxin. ANCHOR The antitoxin was first used to treat a seriously ill girl in , who subsequently recovered. Production of the antitoxin on a large scale was achieved in horses, with both the diphtheria serum and the. Diphtheria serum was a lifesaving treatment, but it did not prevent diphtheria infection. In , William H. Park of the New York City Health Department devised the first vaccine against diphtheria. Building on earlier work by Behring, Park precisely mixed diphtheria antitoxin with diphtheria toxin.

    Diphtheria, acute infectious disease caused by the bacillus Corynebacterium diphtheriae and characterized by a primary lesion, usually in the upper respiratory tract, and more generalized symptoms resulting from the spread of the bacterial toxin throughout the body. Diphtheria was a serious contagious disease throughout much of the world until the late 19th century, when its incidence in. The dose ranges f, units, depending on the severity and length of time of symptoms occurring before treatment. Diphtheria antitoxin is usually given intravenously.


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A plea for larger doses of antitoxin in the treatment of diphtheria by John Hildreth McCollom Download PDF EPUB FB2

A plea for larger doses of antitoxin in the treatment of diphtheria Item Preview A plea for larger doses of antitoxin in the treatment of diphtheria by McCollom, John Hildreth.

Publication date Topics Diphtheria, Diphtheria antitoxin, Diphtheria, Diphtheria Antitoxin PublisherPages: Publication A Plea for Larger Doses of Antitoxin in the Treatment of Diphtheria by John McCollom A Plea for Larger Doses of Antitoxin in the Treatment of Diphtheria Abstract of a paper by John H.

McCollom M.D., Instructor in Contagious Disease, Harvard University Medical Department; Resident Physician, South Department, Boston City Hospital. From a number of sources the recommendation has of late been made for the employment of larger doses of antitoxin than has been customary, especially as the agent is capable only of good, and no seriously ill consequences can be attributed to its action.

For those who may have felt any doubt. Full text Full text is available as a scanned copy of the original print version. Get a printable copy (PDF file) of the complete article (K), or click on a page image below to browse page by by: 1.

The amount of antitoxin recommended varies with larger amounts recommended for persons with extensive pseudomembrane, neck swelling, systemic signs and with longer interval since onset.

The dose is the same for children and adults. Do not repeat dosing9. If limited availability, then use lower dose range.

Severity of diphtheria Dosage for. The author advocates the use of large and repeated doses of antitoxin; the size of the dose should, in his opinion, be determined not by the age and weight of the patient but by the clinical condition.

The author's routine practice is to administer a first dose of 10, units. On subsequent days he injects serum until all symptoms have cleared by: 1. Diphtheria levies a toll of clinical incidence of 10% of all born with a mortality of 5 to 7 per ; immunisation reduces this to an incidence of 1% and zero mortality.

Report of Medical Officers of Health,Diphtheria Immunisation in Infancy,The Medical Officer () 48 In the sanitary s it is hard to envisage the experiences of physicians working in the fever hospitals a century : Jack Howard Botting, Regina Botting.

Full text Full text is available as a scanned copy of the original print version. Get a printable copy (PDF file) of the complete article (K), or click on a page image below to browse page by page. In the treatment of diphtheria, results are best when very large doses of antitoxin are administered.

In an uncomplicated pharyngeal case, the dose should not be less than 20 IU for a child or 40 IU. Dose. - It is better to give a small dose of a concentrated rather than a large dose of a dilute antitoxin.

The dose is the same for children and adults. The strength of it, which is stated on the bottle, varies between and units per cubic centimeter, but it is usually about The antitoxin must be obtained from a reliable source. Systematic use of antitoxin to treat diphtheria did not occur until late Antitoxin in Cincinnati.

We can verify, however, one of the earliest uses of diphtheria antitoxin in the United States, in which two young Cincinnati physicians treated a two-year-old girl successfully with diphtheria antitoxin. It should be injected in the same way as diphtheria antitoxin.

Large doses used thoroughly will influence many cases of tetanus favorably if anything will. Antityphoid Serum is prepared in much the same way that the antitoxins are prepared, but the immunizing. We would plead for more general use of antitoxin as a prophylactic measure in a dose proportionate to the amount of exposure and time of exposure.”.

– Franklin Royer, The Antitoxin Treatment of Diphtheria, with a Plea for Rational Dosage in Treatment and in Immunizing. After a patient can properly withstand these doses of diphtheria antitoxin, it is usually safe to inject larger doses of diphtheria antitoxin intramuscularly at intervals of 20 minutes {06}.

If a reaction occurs after a desensitizing dose, injections should be stopped for 1 hour, recommencing the schedule at intervals of 20 minutes by repeating the last dose that failed to cause a reaction {06}. Diphtheria Antitoxin is currently not licensed in the United States.

The National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is the national center for consultation of suspected diphtheria cases and is responsible for providing diphth antitoxin. Plea for Diphtheria Antitoxin – Publication A Plea for Larger Doses of Antitoxin in the Treatment of Diphtheria by John McCollom MTzz 13&rJ I THE ANTITOXIN TREATMENT OF DIPHTHERIA.

[DEc. 8, DR. HUGHLINGS JACKSON. THE movement, to whichwereferred amonthor twoago, to mark the retirement of Dr. Hughlings Jackson from the active staff of theLondon Hospitalbyaskinghimto sit for hisportrait has, as wascertainto bethe case as soon as it becameknown, attracted the support of many members of.

Thus, an L(+) dose of c.c. toxin + one unit antitoxin applied subcutaneously was of the same toxicity as c.c. toxin + one unit antitoxin injected into the circulation. Diphtheria levies a toll of clinical incidence of 10% of all born with a mortality of 5 to 7 per ; immunisation reduces this to an incidence of 1% and zero mortality.

Report of Medical Officers of Health, Diphtheria Immunisation in Infancy, The Medical Officer () 48 In the sanitary s it is hard to envisage the experiences of physicians working in the fever hospitals a. For injection dosage form: For prevention of diphtheria: Adults and children—One dose injected into a muscle.

For treatment of diphtheria: Adults and children—One to six doses injected into a muscle. Diphtheria antitoxin side effects. Along with its needed effects, a. The author made the following comparative observations in the department of children's infectious diseases of Wilhelmina Hospital at Vienna.

1, cases of diphtheria admitted from Oct. 11,to Jwere divided into two groups. The first numbering cases received doses of antitoxin in accordance with Schick's rule ( units per kilo, of body weight), while the second Author: H. Zischinsky.Diphtheria Toxin-Antitoxin Mixture, Diphtheria Prophylactic (Goat), 30 cc., Bio.

69 Description The indications or uses for this product as provided by the manufacturer are: Each cc. represents 1/10 L + dose of Diphtheria Toxin neutralized to standard with antitoxin obtained from goats.

For diphtheria .• Td – After a series of three appropriately spaced doses of Td vaccines, approximately 95 percent of adolescents and adults achieve levels of diphtheria antitoxin correlated with protection (> international unit of antitoxin/mL), and virtually all adolescents and adults achieve levels of tetanus antitoxin correlated with protection (>0.